Connect with us

Events and Festivals Australia

Muster and Samora Squid excite patrons at Junction Hometown | The Examiner

Published

on

news, local-news, hometown, junction, festival, muster, samora squid, events

The second day of Junction’s Hometown festival did not disappoint patrons. It may have been wet, but spirits were high for the first major event in the North of the state since the pandemic. One of the highlights from Saturday’s first session was Samora Squid, a contortionist and sword swallower who equally unnerved and impressed his onlookers. “I find it really interesting seeing that juxtaposition of emotion in people where they are clearly having a good time but they are also clearly uncomfortable. It’s an interesting reaction,” he said. “They’re amused and they’re shocked.” Related news: Squid said events like Hometown show we can still hold small community events and he enjoyed being back up on stage doing what he does best. “[It was] great. Fantastic. I love making people laugh. I love the reaction it gets.” “I think all the musicians, and all the performers, and all the crew that are working on an event like this, we all get the same kick out of seeing the community all hanging out together. “Seeing and being part of that sense of community is really valuable I think.” Though he has only had four gigs since March and it has been frustrating not being able to work, Squid said he completely supports the government’s actions with regard to the pandemic. “Normally I would do something like The Taste, or Falls, or Festivale, or Taste of the Huon. Those food and wine events aren’t really happening.” “Things have been slow, things have been tough, and I am definitely missing interacting with other performers on the circuit.” In other news: The 35-year-old lived out of his backpack and travelled seasonally for a long time but has settled into a more regular circuit the last five years. Muster was another highly anticipated event of the festival, with the Johnny Cash inspired work well received by ticketholders. One choreographer of the performance, Gabriel Comerford, said it was a special moment seeing the community dance work come together. “The start of the show has quite a meditative reflective space and to see the casts faces at the end – they’re just pure unadulterated joy as they dance in the rain around the fountain.” “It makes it all worth it times a million.”

/images/transform/v1/crop/frm/rJYMCBtgZ6tPW9SEJHL7c7/c049034e-942a-49dd-84e7-d39100bf0305.jpg/r0_1269_2800_2851_w1200_h678_fmax.jpg



Source link

Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Trending